Atlas: Setting the ServiceMethod of an AutoCompleteExtender

by Sander Gerz June 26, 2006 13:39

Recently we had a usergroup meeting on the subject of ASP.NET “Atlas” . In my current project, in which I'm rewriting a number of applications from Notes 6.5 to .NET 1.1 and 2.0, I took the liberty of using Atlas on a couple of webpages. When trying to implement a search feature, I obviously looked at the AutoCompleteExtender. Users needed to be able to search on one of four columns in a table. The ServiceMethod property is pointing to a webservice. This webservice needs to have the exact signature of (string  prefixText, int count). No room for any other parameters. Not to worry though, just create four webmethods and have these call the method doing the actual work.

Setting the ServiceMethod at runtime, e.g. in the DropDownListSearchParam_SelectedIndexChanged event handler, did not work. The changed ServiceMethod-name is not rendered in the resulting xml-script (just check your html). Another option is to insert some scripting in the page, like this:

    <atlas:AutoCompleteExtender runat="server" ID="autoCompleteSearch">

        <atlas:AutoCompleteProperties TargetControlID="TextBoxSearch"

              Enabled="True"

              ServicePath="~/services/WebServiceSearch.asmx"              

              ServiceMethod='<% GetServiceMethod() %>'

              minimumprefixlength="1"  />

    atlas:AutoCompleteExtender>

But no. If you do this, the xml-script that is rendered simply contains &lt;% GetServiceMethod() %&gt;

However, if you set the ServiceMethod-property like this on the atlas:AutoCompleteExtender-element... bingo!

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Edit developer content on the MSDN Wiki

by Sander Gerz June 09, 2006 08:16

Microsoft launched a Wiki website. The MSDN Wiki site is an experiment in order to see how it can integrate community contributions into the Visual Studio 2005 and .NET Framework 2.0 documentation. There's is already so much content available, but there can never be enough. I wonder, though, if there will be much contribution. What would be the benefit of publishing something here over the vast majority of other sites (sites that are actually run by the community, that is: not Microsoft)?

Also, for all Firefox users that want to contribute:

 

But you can give feedback on the MSDN Wiki Connect Workspace. Be sure though to not login on the Connect site first, because you might get this page:

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User Account Control in Vista

by Sander Gerz June 02, 2006 21:02

For the past week I've been testdriving Windows Vista Beta 2. I wanted to install earlier builds before, but I never found the right drivers for my nforce4/sata-raid configuration. While running Vista, you will encounter one specific feature that is inevitable. It's called User Access Control or UAC for short. There have been quite a number of articles, comments, forum threads, and blogposts on the subject so I didn't want to repeat everyone. And then I came accross this post from the UAC team. It explains why it is the way that it is, and they're trying to improve on it.

As I understand, it's difficult to differentiate between a deliberate or a covert application start up. The result is that you get a dialog even when you've just deliberately started an application. It's like saying “do you want to work today?” and of course, everyone will click OK, up to the point where you don't read anymore and just confirm whatever it's asking. In their effort to reduce the number of elevation messages, maybe the team can look an this article from a couple of years ago. And if turns out ok, I won't be seeing these messages anymore:

 

I wonder if the background color in the title has any particular meaning.

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